About Lynn

lynn jaffeeLynn Jaffee is a licensed acupuncturist and the author of the book, Simple Steps: The Chinese Way to Better Health, a clear and concise explanation of Chinese medicine for the lay person. She is co-author of the book, The BodyWise Woman, a personal health manual for physically active women and girls. Read more about Lynn...

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Names and identifying details have been changed on any person described in these posts to protect their identity.

Chinese Medicine and Seven Things That Affect Your Weight

Minneapolis acupuncture clinic for fatigue

Where has my waist gone? I zip up my jeans and where I used to have nice curves, I now have something akin to a small souffle above my waistband. I won’t say muffin top, because the term conjures up something a little racy and care-free. I just have…a little something extra, where before there was a waistline.

It’s the rare person who doesn’t think about their weight, even in the small decisions such as a slight hesitation over that second margarita or whether . . . → Read More: Chinese Medicine and Seven Things That Affect Your Weight

The Nine Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes

Several years ago, I worked with Ralph, a guy in his mid forties who was experiencing back and leg pain. Ralph came for acupuncture once a week for quite a while. After his treatments, his back and legs would be better for a few days, but the pain always came back. The problem was that Ralph was carrying around a beer gut that had to weigh about 50 pounds, and it was putting an incredible strain on Ralph’s back and the back of his . . . → Read More: The Nine Biggest Weight Loss Mistakes

An Ephedra Story

Lisa*, a fit woman in her early thirties came to my clinic a couple of weeks ago to be treated for anxiety. Her anxiety was out of character, out of control, and punctuated by full-blown panic attacks that landed her in the emergency room on a couple of occasions. Her symptoms ranged from shortness of breath and chest pains, to irregular heartbeats.

Lisa was frantic and afraid. She feared having another panic attack, especially while she was driving. This anxiety was consuming her life, . . . → Read More: An Ephedra Story

Obesity, Dampness, and Chinese Medicine

Imagine for a moment a farmer’s field in the countryside that’s green and rolling. With the right amount of sunshine and rain, the field produces healthy crops.  In fact, when it rains, the plants in the field are nourished and turn a little greener and grow a little taller.  But then it rains some more.  And it keeps raining.  And raining.  After awhile that field becomes saturated.  The moisture settles in puddles in the low spots, creating muddy areas.  The plants in those muddy . . . → Read More: Obesity, Dampness, and Chinese Medicine

The Chinese Restaurant Diet

One of the components of Chinese medicine is food therapy.  This means that I frequently talk with my patients about their food choices.  Occasionally, a patient will ask me, “Exactly what should I be eating?”, and my answer is to eat lots of veggies, a little protein, and whole grains.  However, more and more frequently my answer is to eat like you’re in a Chinese restaurant.

You may not think that the deep fried sesame shrimp from your local Chinese restaurant is the healthiest, . . . → Read More: The Chinese Restaurant Diet